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Burrito cake, vows including meticulously designed charts, robocop ice sculpture.

Too rich for my blood, but considering other prices fetched, this is more than fair for such an early page. This particular page is also of special interest to type / lettering nerds: Four unique logo treatments!

I've been following the Covered blog – where cartoonists reinterpret favorite comic book covers – since it was announced, and this is by far my favorite. I'd love to see a whole series of deanthropomorphized covers.

Citing Alan Moore's Swamp Thing hardcover as an example, the author makes a good point: that simple investments like recoloring dated-looking work can pay huge dividends by increasing accessability to new fans. Obvious counterargument: watchmen. Oh, those colors.

I love Tom Gauld's work lots.

1:45 in. I do not think that means what you think it means.

"Faster Santa Claus, Ho! Ho! Ho!"

Based on this flickr feed and her two 'Do Not Disturb My Waking Dream' minis, I am predicting great, great things. Very reminiscent of pages from the Acme Novelty Datebooks in both quality and density.

The syncopation is a little weird, so I couldn't tell what it was that was being played until I read the tags.

Pin Up

Pinup model Bettie Page died this week. I don’t think I ever posted images of the insane push pin mosaic I made in 2006, but since it used an early photo of her as source material, this seems like an appropriate time to do that.

This is a full size, standard 5 foot by 4 foot cork board, covered entirely by colored pushpins. I did roughly one row of pins every few days during 2006. If I were the type to call things I made ‘Pieces,’ this ‘piece’ would be titled ‘Pinup.’

There’s really not much backstory to this – the concept occurred to me and seemed pretty fun, and I was in the middle of a long period of indulging my tendency to make ridiculous mosaics. Many projects of this nature (ie Large-scale mosaics built from non-traditional art supplies) yield cries of “Too much free time” and the like, but I would submit that in practice the actual assembly is meditative in a weird, procedural, decidedly non-mystical way. The finished mosaic now lives in my Wife’s office.

Below: Pins in bulk, source material, and a peek at the workarea. More angles of this mosaic, and two other ridiculous mosaics can be seen at mosaics.kempa.com.